Find hidden treasure in your telecommunications bill

Find hidden treasure in your telecommunications bill

How many businesses focus on cost savings? How many struggle to find the budget for ICT projects? Gartner still tell us that telecommunications represents approximately 38% of ICT spend so CIOs and IT Managers should look for savings here to free up budget to fund more projects. Here are five main reasons we hear for not wanting help reviewing telecommunications spend. They used a company in the past who didn’t find any savings Many “consultants” are not necessarily looking for savings. Some are simply vendors showing you how their solution is cheaper. Others are selling you a service that shows you where you are spending your budget not how you can save money. Then there are the inexperienced who assume as there is no obvious usage (as with an inward fax or alarm) that a service can be switched off – they’re very black and white view shows little understanding of the technology and how it is used. An audit will be too time consuming Auditing should not need too much of the client’s time. At TeleConsultants we know what we are doing. We know exactly what we need from your business and have proven processes that utilise our resources efficiently and minimise requirements on yours. We find the savings – you focus on your core business. There is already in-house staff responsible for auditing In most cases this is more wishful thinking than fact. With even the most capable of staff, IT, accounts and administration don’t normally have the knowledge, expertise or time to truly do the job. In most cases bills are paid with errors included and...
Workforce Management

Workforce Management

For contact centres, management of workforce resources continue to be a major issue and resources are the largest cost. Workforce management encompasses a few other terms being used in the market. Workforce Optimisation Workforce Engagement Management Workforce Optimisation (WFO) technology helps to drive agent and operational efficiency. The idea that happy employees make happy customers is not a new concept, but is gaining enterprise-level attention and traction. A new software category introduced by Gartner called Workforce Engagement Management (WEM) refers to a suite of products that helps companies manage and improve employee engagement. The types of products that make their way into the WEM category will be supplemental to established set of products under the WFO umbrella. The difference simply being that WEM products will have their primary focus on employee engagement, while WFO products focus on overall quality and efficiency of operations. This need to be operationally “well run” is still an important consideration and is at the heart of a WEM solution, but various key market shifts have occurred since the inception of WFO that now need to be factored in. Each of these factors requires much more emphasis to be placed on the employee. Key areas of WEM functionality include: Recruitment and onboarding Evaluation and improvement Time management Assistance and task management Metrics and recognition The voice of the employee (VoE) It is no surprise that the traditional leaders in this area are Verint and NICE. There are also a few contact centre specialist vendors such as Genesys and Interactive Intelligence (now combined as Genesys), but these are generally used only if already using their contact...
Contact Centre Solution Options

Contact Centre Solution Options

In May, Gartner released its annual Magic Quadrant report for Contact Centre Infrastructure (CCI). This raised the question of where have some of the other players gone, with now only two vendors, Cisco and Genesis, in the leaders quadrant. And where does that leave organisations in New Zealand that see managing customer interactions is critical to their success. A few key points to note: Genesys bought Interactive Intelligence (ININ) in 2016 which removed an industry leader. Genesys is committed to the ININ portfolio of PureCloud and CIC (now PureConnect) alongside its historic market leading product, now PureEngage Enghouse Interactive enhances its position as a challenger with EICC, an evolution of the Zeacom product, developed here and used extensively in New Zealand Mitel also remain a challenger with their portfolio including those users in New Zealand that come from using the Solidus platform originally developed by Ericsson/Aastra as part of the MiContact Centre portfolio Avaya, who has always been a leader in this market, drops away due to its financial challenges and clients are expressing dissatisfaction with Avaya’s ability to deliver contact centre solutions ShoreTel, whilst they slip off the Magic Quadrant, still get an honourable mention, along with Alactel-Lucent Enterprise. Both offer solutions in New Zealand and are appropriate for certain situations. They sometimes compete against vendors that are included in the Magic Quadrant CCI is defined as the products (equipment, software and services) needed to operate contact centres for telephony and multichannel support. There are two key areas that closely align and therefore compete in this area of customer engagement centres (CECs). These are solutions that leverage the...
Implementing Centralised UC Solutions

Implementing Centralised UC Solutions

TeleConsultants is increasingly being asked to provide technical project management services to help our clients implement solutions. This is partly from a need to minimise full time resources and also from recognition that this is a specialist area of ICT. Engaging specialist resources means the correct people are involved and ensures that key issues are not overlooked by the different delivery groups. Clients feel that that by selecting a supplier to provide a telephony or unified communications (UC) solution will provide them with an organisation that will deliver the solution with little help from anyone else. Unfortunately this is not the case. The client is required to involve a number of areas of ICT and often these are provided by multiple 3rd parties. What the Unified Communication (UC) solution provider will deliver: Core software, and less often now, some hardware (server, gateways) Endpoints, desk phones, softphones, desktop/mobile UC applications Profession services to install and configure their software What you, the client, and your 3rd party providers, will need to deliver: Windows servers for UC applications (often virtual) Virtual datacentre infrastructure Other server requirements, DHCP, FTP Datacentre switches WAN routers Telecommunications trunks, often SIP Network switches Network design and Windows management expertise (IP addressing, VLANs and group policy etc) Desktop or end user services, Windows/Mac, iOS/Android Integration Server i.e. Exchange, CRM Desktop, i.e. Outlook Other UC apps i.e. Skype for Business There are many pieces of the puzzle that the UC service provider is not responsible for, especially in the datacentre and across the network. These are your servers and your network. UC service providers will come across many different...
Spark – Public Paging Network Closure

Spark – Public Paging Network Closure

The Spark public paging network will close on 30 June 2017. This network has been taken over by the Fire Service for their own purposes and they are also making it available to a select number of New Zealand Health and Emergency Service organisations. Other paging customers will need to look at alternatives. All Spark paging services including Buzzme and Minicall, will stop working from this date. TeleConsultants has been working with clients to find alternatives since 2015, when Spark announced the closure. If you are still unsure how you will replace this service in your business please contact...
What’s happening in Mobile Radio?

What’s happening in Mobile Radio?

TeleConsultants attended the Comms Connect Wellington conference in April. This continues the many years of RFUANZ conferences, who remain Association Partner for the event. The conference highlighted the best in radio and wireless communications from narrow-band radio to PTT over cellular, and from professional LTE to satellite communications. This year’s conference did not stress the convergence of mobile radio and LTE as much as last year.  It did however deliver more practical examples of this happening in the technology on show, as well as the case studies that were presented by vendors, dealers and end users. Emergency services use of mobile radio continues to be a key area. There are also many other industries where this technology is key to delivering critical communications – particularly helping to deliver to health and safety commitments organisations face today. The link below takes you to the conference program and includes further links to the presentations of many of the sessions. We recommend if you are working with mobile radio that you look at what is being done by a number of organisations and we are very keen to discuss how this technology can help your business. http://www.comms-connect.co.nz/conference-program/ The opening address included an update on Radio Spectrum Policy by Len Starling, who is the Manager of Policy and Planning in the Radio Spectrum Management team at the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment(MBIE). As a reminder, MBIE has issued directives for the phasing out of 25 kHz Land Mobile Radio (LMR) channels. For VHF channels the deadline was 1st November 2015, and for UHF channels 31st December 2019. If you are working with,...